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The National League Central is the home of the defending World Series Champions and two of the four teams that reached the playoffs in 2011.  Ergo, it's the best division in baseball! ;D  This preview will ask 12 probing queries and maybe provide some insight of what you can expect in 2012.




Chicago Cubs


Will a change of scenery work for Ian Stewart?

The 10th pick of the 2003 draft was traded to the Cubs with reliever and 2007 first rounder Casey Weathers for outfielder Tyler Colvin and infielder D.J. LeMahieu last winter.  Stewart was sent down to Triple-A Colorado Springs early in the season and wound up hitting just .156 with zero homers and six RBI in over 48 games with the big club.  Battling knee, hamstring and wrist injuries last season,  Stewart is having a hard time staying healthy this spring because of a nagging wrist injury from August.   Baseball America's number four prospect in 2004 has a career .261 average at Wrigley Field, 25 points above his lifetime average.  He hopes to celebrate his 27th birthday by manning the hot corner on Opening Day against the visiting Washington Nationals April 5.

When will the Anthony Rizzo era begin?

The one-time Red Sox and Padres prospect will spend the beginning of 2012 at Triple-A Iowa.  If spring training statistics were the only criteria, it should be Bryan LaHair starting the year in the minors instead.  However, the Cubs want to give the Pacific Coast League MVP and home run king of 2011 a closer look before turning the reins over to RIzzo.  The one thing working in Rizzo's favour is the faith that Cubs GM Jed Hoyer and director of scouting and player development Jason McLeod have in him.  The duo drafted Rizzo while they were with the Red Sox and traded for him with the Padres in the Adrian Gonzalez deal before getting him again for the Cubs in a deal that sent pitcher Andrew Cashner to San Diego.   Rizzo had an OPS of 1.056 at Triple-A Tucson but struggled in a pair of stints with the Padres, batting just .141 with one homer in 48 games.  The 22 year-old Rizzo has faced greater adversity as he was able to recover from Hodgkin's lymphona four years ago.



Cincinnati Reds

Can Zack Cozart handle the fine art of playing shortstop?

Cozart made his major league debut last July and hit .324 with an OPS of .811 in 11 games before going down with Tommy John surgery on his left elbow as a result of a collision at second base with the Braves Nate McLouth.  Still, the production from Cozart was much better from what they were getting from Paul Janish and Edgar Renteria and his OPS was .825 at Triple-A Louisville at the time of his call-up.  That was a 99 point jump from his OPS with the Bats in 2010.  The 25 year-old has been getting advice from Hall of Famers Barry Larkin and Joe Morgan this spring and the Reds hope it will pay off.  Cozart did not make an error during his brief stint and is said to have the tools to get the job done at short according to Baseball America, who rates him the third best prospect in the Reds system.

Could this be Scott Rolen's final year?

Battling shoulder woes on and off since the 2005 season, Rolen had a down year with the bat in 2011 by hitting just five homers and slugging .397 - a full 100 points below his 2010 campaign when he homered 20 times and drove in 83 runs.   He wound up missing the final three months of last season.  In a conversation with fellow former Jay Dan Plesac, Rolen says he is as healthy as he has ever been as the AC joint in his left shoulder has been cleaned out to give him more range of motion.  If spring training is any indication, Rolen should have a good season as the 2012 campaign marks the final year of his contract.  In his 16 year career, Rolen has won nine Gold Gloves with three different teams - the Philadelphia Phillies, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Reds in 2010.  The only team he didn't win one with - the Blue Jays.  Only Edwin Encarnacion remains in the deal that sent Rolen to Cincinnati from Toronto during the 2009 season.  Reliever Josh Roenicke was claimed on waivers by the Rockies last season while starter Zach Stewart was dealt to the White Sox in the mega deal involving Colby Rasmus.



Houston Astros

Can Brett Wallace bounce back with the bat?

The one-time Jays prospect hit just five homers with the Astros and slugged .369 in 379 trips to the plate in 2011.  The 25 year-old was also demoted to Triple-A Oklahoma City in August before being called back up in September.  Coming into camp, Wallace has lost 15 pounds and is trying to prove he can handle third base, where he played during his college days at Arizona State.  The Astros are looking to move Carlos Lee from the outfield to first base, so Wallace finds himself competing with Chris Johnson for time at the hot corner.  With a spot on the major roster not  yet guaranteed, it looks like the Blue Jays sold high on Wallace when they acquired him for outfielder Anthony Gose two seasons ago.  It's been a fall from grace for the 13th overall pick by St. Louis in the 2008 draft.

Could Brad Mills be the first manager fired this season?

The Astros head into their 50th anniversary season trying to avoid triple figures in the loss column for only the second time in franchise history.   The first time happened last season, when they lost 106 games.  That shattered the previous high of 97 losses that was set in 1965 and equaled in 1975 and 1991.  The Astros even underperformed their Pythagorean record of 62-100 by six games and last year's 56 wins marked a drop of 20 from Mills' rookie season in 2010.  Mills is under contract for this season plus an option.   However, with Jeff Luhnow replacing Ed Wade as general manager and Jim Crane taking over for Drayton McLane as owner, the former Expo could be shown the door if the team gets off to a rough start. 



Milwaukee Brewers


Will Nyjer Morgan repeat his success of 2011?

The 31 year-old Morgan and his alter ego Tony Plush batted a career high .304 and helped the Brewers win their first playoff series since 1982 by driving home the winning run in Game 5 of the National League Division Series against Arizona.  His OPS spiked 150 points from 2010 from Washington and after being caught stealing 17 times two years ago, he had just 17 stolen base attempts with the Brewers but was successful on 13 of them.  However, the Brewers hope he will tone down his act off the field after calling Albert Pujols "Alberta" during a heated late season series with the Cardinals.  In a shining example of karma, the Cards got their revenge by beating the Brew Crew in the NLCS.  Morgan was plunked in the head by a Barry Zito curveball this spring but as a former Regina Pat, he was able to shake it off and return to action a few days later.  Morgan is expected to get the lions share of playing over Carlos Gomez in center field.

Can Shaun Marcum recover from his disastrous post-season?

Marcum matched his career high of 13 wins and reached 200 innings for the first time in helping the Brewers clinch the Central.  However, the former Blue Jay appeared to run out of gas as he had an ERA of 5.17 in September before nearly tripling that  mark in the playoffs.  The 30 year-old righty tossed his glove in the air after giving up a home run to Paul Goldschmidt in Arizona during Game 3 of the NLDS and then lost Games 2 and 6 of the NLCS to St. Louis.  Marcum has experienced tightness in his shoulder and only recently pitched for Triple-A Nashville.  He is on track to have four appearances before being ready to pitch in the regular season.  Having worn #28 with the Blue Jays, he has opted not to wear the #28 left behind by Prince Fielder and continue with the #18 he wore last season.



Pittsburgh Pirates

Can Nate McLouth buck the trend again?

McLouth was more than happy to return to the place where his big league career started.  He joined the Bucs in 2005 and was there until early in the 2009 season when he was traded to Atlanta for pitchers Charlie Morton and Jeff Locke and outfielder Gorkys Hernandez.  He hit a combined 20 homers that year with the Pirates and the Braves in 2009 but only managed 10 more over the last two seasons while struggling to hit over .200.  His banner year came in 2008 when he became an All-Star and Glove Gold winner by hitting 26 homers and 46 doubles while adding 23 stolen bases. Right now, the 30 year-old McLouth will be an extra outfielder behind the trio of Alex Presley, Andrew McCutchen and Jose Tabata.  He is also battling a bruised foot but he can provide some sock off the bench as evidenced by a recent home run this spring to help the Bucs beat the Red Sox. 

Will a certain pitcher who bunted a ball into his face this spring get back on track?

This hurler landed a major free agent contract with the Yankees after a 2008 season in Toronto that saw him set career highs with 18 victories and 220-plus innings pitched.  Though he won 34 games in three seasons with the Bronx Bombers and added three more wins in the post-season, he was considered to be such a disappointment after posting 5-plus ERAs over the last two seasons.  That's why the Yankees decided to eat $20 million of the remaining $33 million left on thet 35 year-old's contract in a deal that saw the Pirates give up two low-profile prospects.  However, a bunted ball below his eye last month is expected to keep him out for the first part of the season.  The Arkansas righty is supposed to throw a simulated game this weekend.  When he does make a full return, he'll have former Jays teammate Rod Barajas to pitch to.



St. Louis Cardinals



What do Tony La Russa and Chris Carpenter have in common?  They will not be around on Opening Day thanks to La Russa's retirement and Carpenter's shoulder woes.

How much does Chris Carpenter have left in the tank?

It appears the one-time Medicine Hat Blue Jay will begin the 2012 campaign on the disabled list after recently experiencing weakness behind his right shoulder and neck.  Turning 37 next month, the New Hampshire native has battled various injuries in the past by missing the entire 2003 season with a torn labrum and all of 2007, save for one start, and most of 2008 with Tommy John surgery on his right elbow.  The Redbirds already plan to start Kyle Lohse on Opening Day in Miami April 4.  That's a bit of a drop-off from the man who came up big in the 2011 post-season by outduelling Roy Halladay in his own back yard in the deciding Game 5 of the National League Division Series and winning Game 7 of the World Series by pitching on three days rest.  The pressure will be on Adam Wainwright, who was out all of last season with Tommy John surgery, to fill the void.  He is slated to start the Cardinals home opener against the Chicago Cubs April 13.

How will Mike Matheny fare in replacing "The Genius"?

Going by the Cardinals Spring Training mark of 10-6, he'll do just fine.  By maintaining the current .625 winning percentage, that would put the Cards win total in the regular season to just 101 wins.  That would be better than Tony La Russa's victory totals during his World Series winning seasons in 2006 and 2011 when St. Louis won 83 and 90 games respectively.  The 41 year-old former catcher will enter 2012 as the major leagues' youngest manager.  Like Chris Carpenter, Matheny's fortunes took a turn for the better after leaving Toronto.  Batting all of .215 with the Jays in 1999 after a five season stay in Milwaukee, Matheny won three Gold Gloves with St. Louis and one more with San Francisco before hanging up the tools of ignorance after the 2006 season due to post-concussion syndrome.  Despite having no managerial experience anywhere, not even in Rotisserie Leagues, the Cardinals brass are confident the team will not miss a beat under Matheny.

The predicted order of finish in the National League Central Division for 2012...

1. Reds
2. Cardinals
3. Pirates
4. Brewers
5. Cubs
6. Astros


The Pirate Parrot hopes his club can break the .500 barrier in 2012.
NL Central Preview 2012 | 30 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
John Northey - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 02:00 PM EDT (#253063) #
A wild division where anyone can have hope - even the Pirates.

Think the Jays have been painful - the Pirates last made the playoffs in 1992 (Bonds in LF). Since then they have been sub-500 every season, twice losing 100+. Like the Jays they finished 2nd just once (79-83 in 1997), 3rd twice (99/94), 4th 3 times, 5th 6 times and 6th (last) 7 times. Ouch.

Yet they were in 1st place on July 25th last year. Boy does that say it all about the quality of the NL Central vs the AL East.
John Northey - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 02:03 PM EDT (#253064) #
Just to add to the pain... the Pirates were still in eyeshot on July 28th, just 1 1/2 games out. Then they went to Philadelphia and were swept, then came home for a 7 game homestand and lost all 7. By the time they hit the road they were back to 4th place and 10 games out of first. Ouch.
Mike Green - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 04:44 PM EDT (#253069) #
Nice, #2JB.

In the Hall of Names department, we have a race taking place now for leader of the Official Opposition with candidates named (in order of HoN significance) Nash, Cullen, Ashton, Dewar, Topp and Mulcair.  Surprisingly, the best major league namesake was 19th century third baseman Billy Nash.  I would have thought we would have a better Cullen than utility infielder Tim, but we don't. 

Chuck - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 04:44 PM EDT (#253070) #

The folks in these parts can be divided into two categories: 
* old enough to remember the last time the Pirates were good
* the Pirates were ever good?

hypobole - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 04:58 PM EDT (#253071) #
The reason for Luhnow firing Mills would be?
Mike Green - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 05:06 PM EDT (#253073) #
It's hard to believe, Chuck, but the last time the Pirates were competitive was 90-92.  Doug Drabek, Andy Van Slyke, Bobby Bonilla and some guy named Bonds.  The home nine was last competitive a year later.  I guess that it is better to have 19 years of mediocrity than 20 years of failure. 
bpoz - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 05:15 PM EDT (#253074) #
I remember "We are Family".
How about a history lesson from the elderly gentlemen? Any team this bad had to have high draft picks. They HAD to have some good players.
Dave Rutt - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 06:24 PM EDT (#253075) #
A wild division where anyone can have hope - even the Pirates.

But not the Astros.
smcs - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 06:28 PM EDT (#253076) #
Ya, but the Jays really can't match all of this in terms of awfulness. My favorite part might be the All-Decade Team: "First base Adam LaRoche ('07-09): Got a better idea?"
Chuck - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 06:42 PM EDT (#253078) #

How about a history lesson from the elderly gentlemen?

The list of free agent signings over the past two decades is like something out of Stephen King.

Richard S.S. - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 07:27 PM EDT (#253080) #
I always thought Pittsburgh Pirates' fortunes floundered with the Steel Industry's collapsing or did this occur in different years?
Dewey - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:14 PM EDT (#253086) #
How about a history lesson from the elderly gentlemen?

I qualify for the elderly part, anyway (bpoz,  you are a kindly soul).  My first knowledge of the Pirates was the 1947 team.  I liked watching them because they, along with the Reds, were always competing with the Cubs for last place.  They offered hope in any given season that we might not be 8th in the NL.  (Yes, thatís the number of teams in the league then.)  The 1947 team had Hank Greenberg at 1B, finishing out his stellar career.  A new guy, Ralph Kiner, and Wally Westlake seemed to homer a lot.  A kid named Gene Mauch was an occasional utility infielder for them.  The pitchers were a truly interesting lot:  Rip Sewell,  Kirby Higbe, and Preacher Roe were the Pirates elderly gentlemen (Higbe and Sewell might have been startled ever to be called such).  And there was a young pitcher named Mel Queen pitching for them as well, the father of Ďourí Mel Queen.  I lost track of/ignored the Pirates for a long time, and didnít really appreciate the great Clemente, Stargell teams; but yes, you have to have some sympathy for long-suffering Pirates fans.  In one of Magpieís earlier Ďdata-tablesí, as I recall, the Pirates were shown to have lost more games than any other franchise.  (Correct me if Iíve got that one wrong.)
John Northey - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:21 PM EDT (#253087) #
The Astros are still in the NL? :0

At least the Astros have had winning teams in the past 20 years. Hard to believe the Pirates will hit 20 sub 500 seasons unless thing go right this year.
hypobole - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:34 PM EDT (#253088) #
And there was a young pitcher named Mel Queen pitching for them as well, the father of Ďourí Mel Queen.

Dewey, I did not know this, so I looked him up, and also found something from the "How times have changed" department. His 6.58 K/9 led the NL in 1951. Last year, that would have placed him 33rd in the NL and only 18 qualified pitchers had fewer.
Thomas - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:35 PM EDT (#253089) #
That's a great look at a decade of misery, smcs.

This quote is fantastic: "This story is bigger than Israel-Palestine. It's amazing. We're talking about bottled water." - Pirates owner Kevin McClatchy, at a news conference to reverse policy that bans fans from bringing bottled water into PNC Park.
Mike Green - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:54 PM EDT (#253090) #
I had forgotten some of the details of the Pirates of the 70s.  They won their division six times during the decade, with players like Manny Sanguillen and Richie Hebner playing key supporting roles to the superstar talent (Clemente, Stargell, Dave Parker).  I had forgotten that Blyleven pitched for the 79 Pirates and did a nice job for them in the playoffs; I didn't realize that he had pitched so well in the post-season, 5-1 with a 2.47 ERA.  This was probably mentioned by someone making the Blyleven for Hall of Fame argument, but I missed it,. 

The Pirates moved into Three Rivers at the start of the decade, and had (and built) a club that fit our preconceptions about what a good turf club looked like.  Everyone made good contact, with power supplied consistently by Stargell and occasionally by Bob Robertson or Richie Zisk . Clemente, of course, Al Oliver, Dave Cash, Sanguillen were the typical hitters for the club; the Pirates were usually first or second in the league in batting average.  Thinking back on it, with the turf club and the cocaine haze that ended it in 79-80, the Pirates fit the decade to a tee.

mathesond - Friday, March 23 2012 @ 09:58 PM EDT (#253092) #
Pirates were shown to have lost more games than any other franchise.

I recall the Phillies being the first franchise to lose 10,000 games - I believe it happened around 5-10 years ago. Lord knows, it wouldn't surprise me to learn the Pirates have done enough to catch and surpass them in the intervening years.
Mick Doherty - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 12:12 AM EDT (#253094) #

Query: When did AJ Burnett inherit the "He who must not be named" mantle from Esteban "Voldemort" Loaiza???

The Bucs of the '70s -- The Lumber Company, later rechristened "Lumber and Lightning" -- were a damn fine team, probably third of the decade's franchises after The Swingin' A's of Reggie, Vida and Catfish and, of course, the Big Red Machine. The latter-decade Yankees were outstanding, but the first part of the decade, not so much. The Pirates were at worst very good and at best dominating for the entire 10 years.

Canadian baseball will never see a worse decade, as the Expos were putrid at times and at their best, and ranged up to a peak of okay, while the Jays were an expansion franchise and played like it  Entertaining, both teams were, but good baseball? Not so much.

Mick Doherty - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 12:36 AM EDT (#253095) #

It's admittedly hard to grasp after the past 20 years, but the Phillies have been far worse historically. Even with all the success of recent decades (since about 1976), the Philly franchise is still more than a thousand games under .500. The boys from along the Three Rivers are actually about 100 games over .500 and unless they are putidly awful for a few years, will get to 10,000 wins as a franchise before they get to 10,000 losses ... probably some time in 2014.

Pirates: 9882-9774 (14 playof appearances, 9 pennants, 5 titles) *includes record as Pittsburgh Alleghenies
Phillies: 9237-10,292 (14 playof appearances, 7 pennants, 2 titles) *includes record as Philadelphia Quakers

Ron - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 12:58 AM EDT (#253096) #
Why has the baseball internet community avoided criticizing Neil Huntington? Is it because he was a SABR friendly GM back when he was hired in 2007? We are near the 5 year mark of Huntington's regime and the Pirates are still awful.

Let's see what has happened under this tenure:

- He turned his best trade asset (Jason Bay) into Andy LaRoche , Bryan Morris, Craig Hansen, and Brandon Moss. Morris is the only guy left in the Pirates organization.
- Trade Bautista for Robinson Diaz
- Used his first ever draft pick to select Pedro Alvarez

These 3 moves alone have probably set the Pirates back 5 years.

When you look on the current roster, the 2 best players (McCutchen and Walker) were inherited from the previous regime. Under his watch, he has stayed away from giving out long terms deals to free agents. Last off-season he gave out about 15 million to sign Overbay/Correia/Diaz/Olson. This off-season he has brought in Bedard/Burnett/Barajas/Barmes/McLouth.

You can point to the fact the Pirates have invested a lot more in the draft and the international market since he took over. Now of course this doesn't mean anything if you continue to draft the wrong players and/or can't develop them in your farm system. The Pirates don't look to be playoff contenders this season and it's going to be probably another roughly 3 years before their top pitching prospects reach the majors (a big if) and get established.

It's crazy that Huntington got a new contract extension last year. At what point do the results at the major league level matter? How many years should you give a GM to rebuild?
Thomas - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 07:36 AM EDT (#253098) #
Used his first ever draft pick to select Pedro Alvarez.

IIRC, Alvarez was very well-regarded by the scouting community and there was nothing statistically in his profile to suggest he'd struggle in the majors. It's absolutely fair to criticize the Pirates drafting in some years this decade, such as taking Bryan Bullington first overall or taking Daniel Moskos fourth and just ahead of Matt Wieters. It was widely though Moskos was a mid-rotation starter at best and might end up as a reliever. Now it turns out he may not achieve that, but picking Alvarez was not a decision that was so evidently questioned at the time. If Alvarez doesn't make it, I think you throw up your hands and attribute that to the nature of prospects failing and not to some poor draft philosophy, so I certainly wouldn't blame Huntington for that.

Also, there's a non-zero chance Alvarez pulls an Alex Gordon-light type season this year.

Dewey - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 11:19 AM EDT (#253101) #
I didnít know that either, hypobole, for a long time.  I had somehow assumed the two Mel Queens were one and the same for years -- lazily overlooking the highly unlikely chronology of the matter.   But Da Box put me on the right track some time ago.  It is truly an edifying site. 

And, of course, Mathesond and Mick are right about the Phillies being the all-time champeen losing franchise.  (But cut me some slack;  they both have a P on their cap, right?)

One other thing I remembered about the old Pirates is that after Greenberg at 1B (1947)was Ed Stevens (1948), who some here might remember as a Toronto Maple Leaf in the early 1950ís, one who often seemed to hit an Opening Day home run.   Rocky Nelson was also an ex-Maple Leaf (and Montreal Royal) who played some 1B for the Pirates long ago.
Mike Green - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 11:31 AM EDT (#253102) #
Moskos vs. Wieters was about money.  Picking Moskos over Jason Heyward was, however, bizarre. 
Ron - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 02:34 PM EDT (#253105) #
"IIRC, Alvarez was very well-regarded by the scouting community and there was nothing statistically in his profile to suggest he'd struggle in the majors. It's absolutely fair to criticize the Pirates drafting in some years this decade, such as taking Bryan Bullington first overall or taking Daniel Moskos fourth and just ahead of Matt Wieters. It was widely though Moskos was a mid-rotation starter at best and might end up as a reliever. Now it turns out he may not achieve that, but picking Alvarez was not a decision that was so evidently questioned at the time. If Alvarez doesn't make it, I think you throw up your hands and attribute that to the nature of prospects failing and not to some poor draft philosophy, so I certainly wouldn't blame Huntington for that.

Also, there's a non-zero chance Alvarez pulls an Alex Gordon-light type season this year."

While I agree Alvarez was highly regarded by the scouting community leading up to the draft, there were concerns about his weight and if he would have to eventually move to 1B sooner than later. While he still has time to turn his career around, up to this point, he has been a huge disappointment.

Huntington's first 2 drafts look really poor right now. We are almost at the 5 year mark of his tenure and the Pirates aren't any closer to making the playoffs now when compared to the time he was hired. If I was Bob Nutting and the Pirates finished under .500 again without significant progress in the farm system, I would fire Huntington after the season.
Thomas - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 02:57 PM EDT (#253108) #
While I agree Alvarez was highly regarded by the scouting community leading up to the draft, there were concerns about his weight and if he would have to eventually move to 1B sooner than later. While he still has time to turn his career around, up to this point, he has been a huge disappointment.

I agree he's been a huge disappointment. I just find it hard to fault Huntington on that specific move. Sometimes well-regarded prospects just don't pan out.

greenfrog - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 03:13 PM EDT (#253111) #
Madson out for the year with TJ surgery. Ouch.
Magpie - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 06:04 PM EDT (#253118) #
Can Brett Wallace bounce back with the bat?

Not sure "bounce back" is the operative phrase, as he did increase his OPS+ from 69 to 96 in his second kick at the MLB can. Maybe "actually amount to something useful" would be better.
Mick Doherty - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 06:09 PM EDT (#253120) #
Magpie! Absent for an interminably long (by Magpie standards) time, bounces back hissownself with a cutter of  analysis juiced with a dollop of withering wit! HOO-rah!
Magpie - Saturday, March 24 2012 @ 06:16 PM EDT (#253121) #
Just bringing some snark. Also, trying to get myself interested. Nothing's worked yet, but they do start playing the actual games pretty soon.
MatO - Monday, March 26 2012 @ 01:09 PM EDT (#253176) #

Wallace's OPS+ by month:

April   179

May 102

June  90 

July 21

August  minors

September 12

Yeah, I think "bounce" is appropriate

 

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