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Doin' some damage in my own subtle way

The Sox enjoy their home opener, beating the Jays 5 - 3.


Star of the Game: Josh Beckett recovers from an extremely shaky first inning to shut the good guys down for 7 innings.

Unsung Hero: Mike Lowell goes 4-for-4 with 3 doubles. This is not a good sign. He's supposed to be a weak link, and came into the game hitting .190/.292/.381 in 21 AB. Look for Sweet Smelling Gus to remind Lowell today that he lost it a year and a half ago.

For the Jays: Josh Towers recovers from a 2nd inning whuppin' to hold the Sox off through the 6th. The bullpen needed that.

Defensive Play of the Game: With Lyle Overbay at first, Bengie Molina smacks a liner towards right field which Mark Loretta leaps to get a glove on, deflecting it towards shortstop Sea Bass Gonzalez, who picks it up, steps on the bag, and fires to first for not just your average 4-6-3.

Defensive Misplay of the Game: Wily Mo Pena gives Frank Catalanottoís fly ball the little extra boost it needs, clanking it off his glove and into the bullpen for a homer. Did you know you can watch the top plays of the previous day's games for free at MLB.com? I wouldn't lie to you about this. Follow this link, and look for "Top Play".

Quť Onda? Jerry Howarth mentions the wave splashing around Fenway in the bottom of the 8th. Ha! Idiots got idiot fans too!

Streakers: Vernon Wells has at least one hit in all 7 games this season. Ben Molina has at least one base knock in all 5 games he's played. Aaron Hill has a 6-gamer that started in the 2nd game of the season.

Injury of the Game: Trot Nixon strains his left groin at some point in the 3rd. He says he'll miss at least 5 days.

But More Importantly: The Blue Jays announced that Roy Halladay will miss his next start with "stiffness in his right forearm".

2 DP Too Many DP: As much as it felt like the Jays hit into about 16 double plays, it was actually just the highlight reel one to end the 4th and the knife-in-the-throat one to snuff the first. Shea The Hit Man Hillenbrand has now tallied 4 GIDPs and 2 HBP on the young season. Last year he totalled 21 and 22. The team is on pace for 185 rally killers, compared to 125 in 2005. American League average was 133, and only 3 teams hit into fewer than the Jays. Who knew?

Is it OK to Panic? Not yet.

When? Maybe in a week. But panic's a strong word, unless something is really wrong with Doc. If Shea hasn't started into his customary hot start a week from today and Rios is still hitting well, look for Hinske to move into a platoon with Hillenbrand and Rios to play every day. Concurrently, expect better D and fewer DPs.

Boxscore: Voila.

Elsewhere

Contender or Pretender? I say Chien-Ming Wang was well over his head last year. Millions of Yankee fans disagree. The Kansas City Royals have more influence than me and several of those Yankee-ites, and they see things my way: they cuffed Wang for 8 hits, 2 walks, and 5 runs over 6 innings and nearly spoiled the Yankee home-opener. Down 9 - 7, two Royals reached with one out against Rivera in the ninth, but he came out of it by striking out Reggie Sanders and catching a Doug Mientkiewicz liner back up the middle. I say Mint-kay-vich. What say you?

Curious Line of the Day: Brian Bannister held the sad-sack Nationals to just 3 hits and no walks through 7 innings, but managed to strike out only one. And after an uneventful Aaron Heilman eighth, Billy Wagner came on to walk three Nationals in the ninth. No harm done.

That Warn't No Pitchin' Dool: On paper, the best matchup of the night was Danny Haren versus Brad Radke. On the field, they surrendered 4 bombs and 11 runs.

Back In The National: Bronson Arroyo is lovin' it, collecting his second W of the season by tossing 7 shutout innings and hitting his second round-tripper in as many games. While Bronson leads Wily Mo 2-0 in home runs hit, he trails Pena 2-1 in home runs allowed.

Today

Gustavo Chacin in the blue corner, David Wells in the red. Last year the Jays boomed Boomer for 32 hits and 18 runs over 26-1/3 innings, 4 starts, a nifty 6.15 ERA. That'll do!

Josh Towers is brought to you by the man, the myth, the legend, A-ron Reynolds. Gustavo Chacin is brought to you by Bradley Newbatt and the letter F.
Learnin' the Words, Turnin' the Double Play | 62 comments | Create New Account
The following comments are owned by whomever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Gerry - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 08:49 AM EDT (#144980) #
Remember in the winter Hillenbrand talked about his new swing and how it would make him a much better hitter in 2006?  Ah, the hopes and dreams of the off-season.
Rob - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 09:59 AM EDT (#144981) #
The Boston Herald has a short blurb about something I thought was happening yesterday (though I noticed it at a different time than they did). Varitek said the Jays were stealing signs from second. He didn't get all mad and whiny like Ryan Franklin last year, but he did say the Jays have a reputation for doing this and he even talked about it with Beckett before the game started.

Mike Green - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 10:19 AM EDT (#144983) #

Panic in April?  Never. It's a time to find out what you have. We have learned that the Overbay-Hillenbrand-Molina combination in the 5-6-7 slots tends to result in a high number of double plays. 

Pepper Moffatt - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 10:31 AM EDT (#144984) #
"We have learned that the Overbay-Hillenbrand-Molina combination in the 5-6-7 slots tends to result in a high number of double plays. "

We've also learned that water is wet and marshmallow peeps are indestructible.
Mike Green - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 10:51 AM EDT (#144986) #
Maybe it is "cruel to be kind in the right measure", Pepper, but I'm trying hard.
Nigel - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:02 AM EDT (#144987) #
I thought the other key aspect of yesterday's game was that after throwing nealy 50 pitches in the first two innings, the Jays let Beckett throw only just over 50 pitches the rest of the way.
Leigh - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:08 AM EDT (#144988) #

If only Hillenbrand wasn't such a gamer, the Jays could take him out of the lineup.  Damn. 

On the left, the Red Sox are playing Kevin Youkilis in the leadoff spot.  On the right, the Reds are giving Tony Womack regular playing time.  Where will the Jays situate themselves on the Spectrum of Lineup Construction Competence?  The answer, of course, is dependant upon the circumstances.  Is the team aware that Hillenbrand is an out-eater of the first order and is trying to replace him but (for reasons that people, like myself, who are not in baseball management cannot appreciate) is having difficulty doing so?  This level of self-awareness that will hopefully lead to a solution would situate the team on the left.  Or, does the team feel that Hillenbrand - the bi-weekly walker - is a perfectly acceptable DH and that the situation is fine?  This would put the management in Littlefield/Baird territory on the right end of the Spectrum - a harsh indictment that is unfair to assume without knowing the behind-the-scenes facts.

Argh.

Named For Hank - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:20 AM EDT (#144989) #
I'm with Nigel -- watching the first inning, I thought the Jays had Beckett under their collective thumbs.  Not so much for the rest of the game.

Did they not get many more batters to second to continue to steal signs?  Was that the key to the first inning?  Or did Beckett figure out what he was doing?  Or some combination?

greenfrog - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:35 AM EDT (#144990) #
What amazes me is how often baseball ends up being a game of inches. Hillenbrand's near-walk on a 3-1 pitch in the 1st. Molina's line drive that nearly cleared Loretta's leap. A few tough calls by the plate ump against Towers early on. Chulk's pitch location to Ortiz. In the long run, these things tend to average out (that's the beauty of a 162-game season), but they don't provide much immediate consolation.


Paul D - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:57 AM EDT (#144991) #
"Jerry Howarth mentions the wave splashing around Fenway in the bottom of the 8th. Ha! Idiots got idiot fans too!"

I've never understood the hatred for the wave.  There's nothing wrong with having fun at the ballpark, and the wave is designed to distract the opposing pitcher, so if your'e going to do it, do it in the home half of an inning.

(I apologize for not using italics, but I can't get them to work, either by using the buttons above the text box, of the old fashioned way of just typing them out <i>.  I tired both HTML and plain text view.
Mike D - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:03 PM EDT (#144992) #

I'll only note for the record that at last year's all-star break, Hillenbrand's 87 games of .302/.364/.451 was a blip, a small-sample-size anomaly that was clearly a short-term fluke.  Now, after a sample size of seven poor games (okay, seven atrocious games), indisputable proof is finally upon us that Shea Hillenbrand is incapable of playing the game.  If these seven games were red-hot, it would be, of course, a hopeless fluke and meaningless alchemy.

Hindsight rules, baby!

Jonny German - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:14 PM EDT (#144995) #
It's not so much the wave itself I hate, it's that wave aficionados invariably have no sense of the game and don't care that they're making it impossible to watch the action on the field. If it's during a pitching change or a blowout or something, fine. I've never heard of the theory of the wave distracting the pitcher. Got any data on that? Anecdotes?
#2JBrumfield - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:26 PM EDT (#144996) #

I thought after Opening Day, Hillenbrand was going to be Mr. April again like last year.  He drove in the season's first run with a sac fly on an 0-2 pitch off Santana to tie the game at 1-1.  That was a clutch play that was overshadowed in all the hoopla of opening day.  He did go 2-for-3 that night as well. 

Unfortunately, that's pretty much all he has done.  With his penchant of hitting into double plays, it's almost getting to the point that if it's less than 2 outs, you're  rooting for the strikeout.  With the way this club hits into DP's, could this be the slowest Blue Jays team on record?

 

Leigh - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:31 PM EDT (#144998) #

Yes, Mike D.  Those are first negative words that I have ever written about Hillenbrand. 

He is a .290ish hitter who walks 25 times a year and grounds into 20 double plays per year and will slug between .450 and .470.  That's fact, Mike.  The difference between us is how useful or harmful we feel that a hitter who produces - with remarkable reliability - those numbers is.  Reasonable people disagree all the time, and this is one such instance.

You know damn well that I am not basing anything on this young season.  Anything that he ever does, over a short period of time, that deviates from the above noted performance level should be regarded as a fluke, whether good or bad.

Mike D - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:35 PM EDT (#144999) #

So long as that's your argument, Leigh, I have no problem with it whatsoever.  It's well-said, and it frames the debate much better than I feared it was before.

I will note what Greenfrog said, though -- it's hard to do more to draw a walk than to take five straight pitches, including a borderline 3-1 pitch, and then foul off a few strikes.  Unfortunately, the soul-destroying double play ball, to which Shea is surely prone, followed next.

Mike Green - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:46 PM EDT (#145000) #

I wasn't intending to suggest at all that these 7 games are representative of what can be expected offensively from Hillenbrand.  He will hit into double plays, but he's also likely to hit for a better average and with medium range power.

Having a slow #5 hitter who gets on base a lot, such as Overbay, followed by two hitters who hit into a large number of double plays is not good lineup construction.  The #5 hitter leads off more innings than anyone save the #1 hitter in the lineup.  Slow runner on 1st with nobody out and two double play machines behind is not recommended by central casting.

If you're putting Hinske in the lineup, it's obviously for his bat rather than his glove.  He could hit ahead of both Hillenbrand and Molina, or between them to reduce the risk.

 

Pepper Moffatt - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 12:52 PM EDT (#145001) #
Batting average would be a lot more useful metric if it took into account a double-play.  Every time a player hits into a double play, he should have a hit taken away from his total, for the purposes of calculating batting average, because that's what he essentially did to the team - he took the previous player's hit (or walk) away.

When you did that for all players, I'm sure Hillenbrand's BA would still be higher than league average (which is now a fair bit lower), but the gap would close substantially.

Mike Green - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 01:06 PM EDT (#145002) #
Actually, it's a little worse than that.  Some singles come in low-leverage (from a run-scoring perspective) situation, e.g. nobody on, 2 out.  All GIDPs are in at least moderate-leverage situations.  1-4 with no GIDP is actually somewhat better than 1-3 with a GIDP.
Paul D - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 01:25 PM EDT (#145003) #
I've never heard of the theory of the wave distracting the pitcher. Got any data on that? Anecdotes?

I believe I heard it mentioned once on a broadcast and it stuck with me.
I don't imagine that there are any pitchers who actually are distracted by it, but that's the theory I think.  I'll see if I can do some research on this this afternoon.
Rob - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 02:16 PM EDT (#145005) #
Batting average would be a lot more useful metric if it took into account a double-play.  Every time a player hits into a double play, he should have a hit taken away from his total, for the purposes of calculating batting average, because that's what he essentially did to the team - he took the previous player's hit (or walk) away.

Hillenbrand had 173 hits last year and 21 GDP. So, his adjusted average would be .256 instead of the .291 it was.

When you did that for all players, I'm sure Hillenbrand's BA would still be higher than league average (which is now a fair bit lower), but the gap would close substantially.

Using statistics from Sportsnet.ca, the league average was .266. (It was actually .268, but that's close enough. I didn't get every single player into the study.) After adjusting the batting averages, the average was .242.

So Hillenbrand's BA, when unadjusted, was 9% higher or 25 points higher than league average. Adjusting those numbers makes it (approximately) 6% higher or 14 points higher. Good call, Pepper.
robertdudek - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 02:17 PM EDT (#145006) #
Myent-KAY-Veech

But hey, I'm Polish.



robertdudek - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 02:21 PM EDT (#145007) #
This is the slowest Blue Jays team ever.


Craig B - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 03:22 PM EDT (#145011) #

Batting average would be a lot more useful metric if it took into account a double-play.  Every time a player hits into a double play, he should have a hit taken away from his total, for the purposes of calculating batting average, because that's what he essentially did to the team - he took the previous player's hit (or walk) away.

Actually, a double play not only takes another hit away, it also adds an extra out, which is like an extra unsuccessful at-bat.  So a more accurate measurement of the GDP impact on batting average is (H-GDP)/(AB+GDP).  Of course, we should then take away the at-bat from the player who gets erased as well, but that's getting too complicated.

Ryan C - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 03:28 PM EDT (#145012) #
Just a thought but might a player's tendecy to GIDP be at least partially dependant on their spot in the lineup?  If there's no one on base in front of you then it's impossible to GIDP.  Hitting leadoff would give you at least 1 AB per game where it would be impossible to GIDP, whereas the 3/4/5 hitters would face alot more ABs with a man on first.


Tyler - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 03:40 PM EDT (#145013) #
Re: The Wave.  I've never heard either that it's supposed to distract the pitcher-I think it's more of an entertaining the morons who can't be satisfied with watching a baseball game type thing.  It happens virtually every game at Skydome-I went to two of the Twins games and it happened both times there.  I just find it irritating-by all means, have fun at a baseball game but some of us actually want to watch the game and having the entire section stand up every minute (during the play, as often as not) is downright rude.
robertdudek - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 03:50 PM EDT (#145016) #
Actually, Craig's formula is wrong.

Consider the simple case of a single followed by a GIDP:

Player 1: 1 hit, 1 AB
Player 2: 0 hits, 1 AB
Total: 1 hit, 2 AB (1 out implied)

This is the problem that Craig is trying to address. Craig's formula:

Player 1: 1 hit, 1 AB
Player 2: -1 hit, 2 AB
Total: 0 hits, 3 AB (3 outs implied)

This is clearly incorrect, as there have been only two outs recorded.

Making the correction Craig suggests (taking an AB away from player one):

Player 1: 1 hit, 0 AB
Player 2: -1 hit, 2 AB
Total: 0 hits, 2 AB (2 outs implied)

The total is correct, but now Player 1 has a hit without an AB, making his batting average infinite - an impossibility, and not at all reflective of what player 1's impact (if no GIDP followed he would have 1 hit/1 AB) is.

The correct formula adjustment would be: (H-GIDP)/AB = GIDP adjusted BA

Here's how it looks:

Player 1: 1 hit, 1 AB
Player 2: -1 hits, 1 AB
Total: 0 hits, 2 AB (2 outs implied).

Player 1 gets what he deserves, namely 1 hit in 1 AB; the total for the two players is also correct.





Parker - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 04:46 PM EDT (#145023) #
Tyler, would you prefer that all those morons (which I'm generously interpreting as "casual fans") not bother buying tickets and doing the wave in front of their TV's instead?  I understand the objection from the perspective of a "true fan" but I think it's a lot more important to make the game accessible to more people, and entertaining non-baseball activities during the game will draw a lot more fans than yelling at all the morons to sit down.
VBF - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:09 PM EDT (#145024) #

I personally cringe whenever people try to do it during a close game, but I've taken to Parker's opinion about it and I take comfort in the fact that Jays fans aren't alone in doing the wave. I won't partake in it unless the Jays are up considerably, but I can hardly fault people who are having fun. Of course there's a line at some point in how far fun goes, but it's a harmless act.

I'm a little bothered by so many people badmouthing the people at the Dome (the fans gave Doc a really good ovation on Sunday and DepecheJay was bashing us for it!). The RC always comes through in the clutch (see Halladay, Roy, Win 22 and 2005, 2006 Opening Night) so can we please leave the good fans there alone?

VBF - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:11 PM EDT (#145025) #
And to add to that, I've been at every home game to date, and I can say that for every wave started, there was at least 10 before it that failed because, like the good fans we are, were trying to watch the game.
JayWay - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:23 PM EDT (#145026) #

Parker,

The problem is when those "entertaining non-baseball activities" interfere with a crucial 3-2 count with men on and two out. And it's almost always in those types of situations that the wave rears its ugly head.

 

The problem with the wave (well, one of the problems with the wave...) is that it's energy that could easily be re-directed towards more constructive activities - say, supporting the team... It's a piss off that Toronto crowds are so bloody lifeless, yet when they finally decide to get off their rear ends and do something other than gossip with the person next to them, it's to do something that not only has nothing to do with the game, but in many instances takes away from it.

There's also the issue of the token "wave starter". Anyone who's ever been to a ball game knows what I'm talking about. There's always one. Typically mid 20's to early 30's. Jock type. A beer in hand. The ones who act like it's their life's ambition to start the wave, and to do it as obnoxiously as possible.

 

"OK EVERYBODY! WE'RE GOING TO DO THE *WAVE*!!! ONE.. TWO... BOOOOO!! COME ONE!! OK... ONE.... TWO....THREEEEEEE!!!"

Every game there's always one, and it's always the same schtick, and they're almost always shmucks with little interest in the game, the type that would, through a drunken haze, try and start a wave while Greg Zaun is laying motionless on the field, which is exactly what happened.

Mylegacy - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:31 PM EDT (#145027) #
Scout.com reports that the Brewers picked up Perkins.
VBF - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:32 PM EDT (#145028) #

Those people are everywhere at all baseball stadiums, unfortunately. It isn't a Toronto thing. As I mentioned earlier, the wave usually does fail at least 5 times more than it's successful and these wave starters represent .01% of the actual crowd.

It's quite unfair to label fans at the RC a certain way because of such a small population of jerks. Though while we're on this topic, it would be nice to see the crowds get behind their team and consider themselves one with the team, instead of sitting back and expecting some show to be put on before their eyes.

zeppelinkm - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:37 PM EDT (#145030) #

I think you guys are being too harsh. The wave passes through your direct vicinity in a period of 3 - 4 seconds. There are seldom ever moments so crucial in baseball that will unfold in that time span. If you guys can honestly say you can't tune out the wave while it passes you by, or that it somehow always manages to come up at a critical moment (although I think that is false, chances are its happened once or twice during a critical moment, but those are the instances that stay in your memory) then maybe you have a legit case. Otherwise, suck it up and let it slide, and let those people enjoy the wave. They're the ones that will make or break the jay's ticket success because they are the flimsy fans who will just as soon leave.

And leave that joe-wavestarter alone. He's just there and trying to get the fans energetic and worked up. You should be thanking him for trying his damnest for trying to increase the fun factor for all those casual fans - because if they have a good time, they'll come back.

I am not trying to say that doing the wave will either make or break a fan's experience and dictate their future return to the game. Just based off experience, when I went to a hockey game with my girlfriend - who has NO interest in sports, she certainly seemed to enjoy the atmosphere that was created by fans being rowdy and doing the wave. She said she had a good time and would come back again in the future. I highly doubt she would have had a good time if all the "FANS" just sat around, and analyzed (silently, of course, don't want to ruin anybody's concentration) the game, and quietly celebrated each good play made, etc.

 

 

 

JayWay - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:51 PM EDT (#145032) #

Parker,

 

Ok, letís ignore how the wave affects me. Letís focus on how it affects the players. Imagine youíre Roy Halladay; youíre on the mound and youíre facing a crucial at-bat, one that could make or break the game. Itís at this point that you expect the fans to take it up a notch and really get behind you. Instead, they do the opposite. Someone starts the wave and the impression you're left with is that the fans would rather amuse themselves by waving their hands in the air than concern themselves with helping you get out of a jam. It screams apathy on the part of the fans and itís a slap in the face to the players. Iím often left feeling embarrassed for them because I can only imagine how let down they are by the lack of support. And yes, this has happened (it happened during the home opener), and while you may be right that these types of situations stick out in my mind, the fact is that they do take place, and thatís a problem.

 

As for Mr. Wave StarterÖ why canít he be Mr. Chant starter? Or Mr. Slow Clap starter? Again, itís energy that would be better off spent actually supporting the team.  

VBF - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:55 PM EDT (#145034) #

I didn't even catch this:

I highly doubt she would have had a good time if all the "FANS" just sat around, and analyzed (silently, of course, don't want to ruin anybody's concentration) the game, and quietly celebrated each good play made, etc.

We're not anti-noise, we're anti-wave (and I'm not even totally anti-wave).

You're Troy Glaus, there's a runner on first, none out, in the bottom of the ninth. The score is 3-3 and you're facing Joe Nathan. The crowd does give you a noisy boost when your name is announced, but it gets quieter when you step into the batter's box. Then all of a sudden, you hear, from section 113D, a loud "ONE, TWO THREE, YAAAAAY", and you look up and the fans have started the wave. You take a closer look at the crowd and see that people all over the stadium are following the path of the wave, as supposed to the path of the baseball.

Does that make you want to win the game for the fans? You definitely want to win the game and will do whatever it takes, but you definitely notice the the fans have minimal interest in what's actually happening on the field. It doesn't feel good.

Doesn't anyone notice that it's been ages since a player has actually said something good about Jays fans? Yea, there's been whispers here and there about fan interest, but the only time I've actually ever heard someone say that they 'did it' for the fans was Doc after his 22nd win in 2003. Doesn't that bother people?

Yes, I realize I've somewhat jumped ship on this issue, and due to the renewed interest and expectations this year, I don't think the situation listed above will happen in the future (it most certainly happened in the recent past), but it doesn't feel good as a player when the people who paid money to see you play, aren't actually paying full attention.

Once in a while, one of these players writes a book and includes a section about it, making it even more noticeable. To the credit of the fans, that player was later pelted with donuts on the field.

Mick Doherty - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 05:57 PM EDT (#145035) #
If you're Roy Halladay, you don't see the wave or notice if or when it is going around the stadium. You have, as Costner so poorly put it in "For Love of the Game," engaged the mechanism.
Mick Doherty - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 06:06 PM EDT (#145037) #
There is now a "Wave" poll here on Batter's Box. Vote now or forever hold your peace!
Willy - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 07:40 PM EDT (#145043) #
It's interesting, one of the major differences between fans today and those a generation or two ago is that many of today's fans seem to think that the ballpark experience is, to a surprising degree, about *them*.  And many players seem to buy into this notion.  The topic is worth an essay, but I'm tired just now.  Maybe another time.
Jabes - Wednesday, April 12 2006 @ 11:25 PM EDT (#145048) #
Does anybody know what Paul DePodesta is doing? I think it would be a great idea for the Jays to bring him in as an advisor for the season, if only to help the organization with some talent evaluation given the current state of the minors.

Even if DePodesta just made notes and reports for the Jays, that alone would be invaluable.
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