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Recently, after we toured a Hall of Names gallery for each of the 25 most common North American surnames, we also took a dive into the It Makes Census pool, which had a 25-man roster composed of one player each from the candidates with those 25 surnames.

Well, first things ... uh, second, as it turns out ... as we now undertake the same process with the 25 most common first/given names. But there is a bit of a twist ...

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"Roy" has always been an important name in Toronto Blue Jay terms. Roy Hartsfield, of course, was the team's first manager, compiling a career 166-318 mark in three seasons from 1977-79. Roy Howell made the 1978 All-Star team as a Blue Jay (.270/8/61 as the team's starting 3B). Roy Lee Jackson had four solid years (1981-85) as a RH setup guy for the Jays after being acquired from the Mets in exchange for the team's very first expansion draft pick, Bob Bailor. And it appears that Jackson is the primary "Roy" in team's history not to bear a family name beginning with "H."

Oh, yes, you all know Mr. Halladay, right?

Well, with perhaps some competition from a fellow down in Houston who has been pretty good this post-season, Halladay is likely to be at or near the top of this Hall of Names team's rotation; that's right, it's time to meet ...

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Jazz shares history with baseball, rising in the Roaring Twenties, and falling late last century. And now, we'll try to get jazz and baseball to share a team.

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So we've completed construction of the newest wing on Baseball's Hall of Names -- full (or in a few cases, nearly full) rosters representing each of the 25 most common North American surnames. Of course 25 is a magic number in baseball -- it's the number of players on a regulation in-season roster. Which leads us to this rhetorical exercise:

What is the best possible roster we could build consisting of 25 players, each bearing a different one of those 25 most common American surnames? It's quite a bit trickier than simply choosing the best player off each roster ...

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And: Walking the "Sandy" Beaches

Now, as you may recall from the most recent Hall of Names entry regarding "Walkers," I admitted that we've been saving the 17th-most-common North American surnmae for last in this presentation of the Top 25; that name is Thompson and the fact of the matter is, you'd put off doing your wife's (and father-in-law's) name, too, just to make sure it was done properly.

Such is the case here as we attempt to construct a roster from the 40 or so big leaguers who have borne that particular surname. Of course, as always ...

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All-October 20

As regular readers of this feature on Batter's Box will no doubt already know, I make no qualms about the fact that I stole -- er, borrowed -- the whole concept of "Baseball's Hall of Names" from that "other" Mick Doherty, he would no doubt claim "the original" Mick Doherty, dad.

In lieu of spending actual cash on a birthday gift (no, seriously, dad, it's on the way), I'm here to spend some cache instead ... in the form of an All-Birthday Hall of Names team. Some may recall that we've encroached on this territory before, with an All-July 20 team that celebrated (ahem) my own date of birth.

So now, exactly three months later, we revisit the concept and put together a team that, frankly -- no, wait, there are no Franks on the team, so instead, we'll put together a team that [affect Cary Grant voice here] Judy, Judy, Judy (Johnson), would just beat the living hell out of my own all-birthday lineup.

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You know the old baseball saying, passed down from little league coaches of yore, "A walk's as good as a hit," right?

Well, does that mean that our All-Walker team will be filled with Hitters? Well, with Harry, Larry, Dixie and Todd in the lineup, it just might be.

Just two of the top 25 most common North American surnames remain in our quest for the perfect Hall of Names lineup/roster; for reasons that we'll delve into later, we're saving the #17 name for last and skipping right to #25, which you will have surmised from the preceding paragraph, is "Walker."

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The 18th most-common North American surname is "Garcia" -- and it's the highest-ranking non-Anglo surname on the list; yes, yes, we've already unveiled the All-Martinez team, but keep in mind that Martinez ranks 19th, or just behind Garcia, among North American surnames.

Latino naming conventions are somewhat different, of course, so we will make some allowances for what "surname" means by focusing on those players who commonly used the name as the "second" or "family" name -- you know, the one that appears on the back of the jersey. That means that former All-Star middle infielders Carlos Jesus Garcia Guerrero and Damaso Domingo Garcia Sanchez are eligible. They'd better be ..

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There have been 29 major league players with the surname "Martin" -- just four of them have been All-Stars, and one of those four -- the one you've probably thought of already -- will both start at 2B and manage the team, at least until an impatient owner fires him ...

Of course Martin, the 16th-most common North American surname, is literally only 75 percent of the name that Martinez is (the first six of eight letters is three-quarters, or 75 percent, natch) and Martinez is the 19th-most popular North American surname (though there have actually been more big league Martinezes, 33, than Martins), so we'll visit Hall of Names team for both ...

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The fifteenth most-common North American surname is "Harris." Honestly, it's not a sexy baseball name. Now, if we were talking gridiron, as in the NFL, we'd have a running back named Franco and a defensive back named Cliff in our Hall of Fame and All-Pro coffers, with one of the first black quarterbacks, James, also a Pro Bowler, along for the ride.

But for baseball? Well, the biggest name is that of a Hall of Famer, sure, but a manager -- Bucky. Actually, like his (Sparky) Anderson predecessor, Bucky Harris was also a starting 2B in the big leagues, but where the Andersons had Garrett and Brady and a few other guys to populate the lineup, the case can be made that Bucky, at .274 over parts of 12 seasons, is actually the best hitter -- even the best player -- on an All-Harris team.

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Lewis and Clark .... because these two names, while not quite adjacent on the list of most common North American surnames (Clark is at #21, while Lewis lags a bit at #23), are so indelibly tied together historically, here we present BOTH the All-Lewis and All-Clark Hall of Names teams.

Alternate spellings are not eligible; so the 18 Clarkes, including HOF manager Fred Clarke, are right out. However, the Acting Commissioner should these teams ever play each other, of course, would be HOF OF Louis Clark Brock. Sure, he spells his given name differently than the surname in question, but close enough!

"Close enough"? Boy, good thing those explorer guys named Lewis and Clark didn't say that before finishing their cross-country trek.

As always ...

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The twelfth most common surname in North America is "Thomas." That's as a last/family name. The thing about "Thomas" is that it's also the tenth most common male first (given) name, and as such, also a pretty damn common middle name, though there aren't any obvious and relaiable statistics on that last point.

Speaking of points, the point here is that while there have been 38 big-league ballplayers -- the same number of instances the #11 name Anderson had, just as the #9 and #10 names, Moore and Taylor, each had exactly 47 apiece -- there have been far more with that appellation as a first or middle name.

In fact, even if you count only players who have been inducted into the Hall of Fame or made an All-Star team (thus ignoring virtually every first/middle-named Thomas who played before 1933), there have been 26 with the first name Thomas and 21 more with that middle name.

Perhaps here we should engage in a bit of, er, Thomistic clarification ...

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The headline and the subject matter of this story gives away the answer to a pretty good trivia question -- what is the only surname to be represented by four Hall of Famers? It's Robinson, of course, which is only the 20th-most-common North American surname, but which has graced the great game with Brooks, Frank, Jackie and Wilbert.

So here's the trivia question: there are 10 other surnames that are in Cooperstown twice (though only two of those pairs are brothers), and two more with three Hall of Famers each. How many can you name?

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There have been thirty-eight (38) major league ballplayers to bear the last/family name of "Anderson" which is #11 on the list of "Most Common North American Surnames." That, as you might expect, is just a noodge below the 47 candidates we had for each of the #9 All-Moore and #10 All-Taylor teams.

But unlike the Moore and Taylor squads, the All-Anderson team will have a Hall of Famer -- a little .218-hitting 2B who went on to spark a much more successful career as a big league skipper in Cincinnati and Detroit.

He'll take the helm of this team, which shares its team name with that of namesake college Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana (be honest -- you didn't know the place existed, right?) meaning it's time to meet ...

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By amazing coincidence, there have been forty-seven (47) major league ballplayers to bear the last/family name of "Taylor" which is #10 on the list of "Most Common North American Surnames." The "coincidence" part comes from the fact that the last team we did, the All-Moore squad, also had 47 candidates.

Actually, come to think of it, that's less of an amazing coincidence and more of a statistical likelihood; pulling from approximately the same-sized population pool, there have been an identical number of Moores and Taylors to make the big leagues so far. (There has never been a player named "Taylor Moore," though.)

Obviously, that Taylor total does not include the four men who bore that appellation as a first/given name, nor the dozen who had it as a middle name. None of those 15 were All-Stars, either, with 2B Elliott Taylor "Bump" Wills the biggest name and 1920s-era OF Taylor Douthit probably the best player.

As with the Moores, no Taylor has yet been inducted to the Hall of Fame; but where the Moores had five former All-Stars available for roster selection, the Taylors have managed just one, former PHI 2B Tony Taylor. One place the Taylors have the advantage on the Moores ...

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